June is for LOVE!

Were you a June Bride?

June is all about weddings and I got to wondering about engagement and wedding rings and just why the third finger of the left hand.  So here we go…

Here is an approximate timeline of this evolution from a fellow blogger:

ANCIENT PAST
As Egyptian fortunes were excavated, they were found to be buried with a metal wire tied around the third finger of their left hand. According to legends, this finger is believed to be directly connected to the vein going to the heart.

MIDDLE AGES
As per most historians, the first official use of an engagement ring was made by Archduke Maximillian of Austria in 1477 when he gave Mary of Burgundy a gold ring with tiny diamonds set in the form of an M.

1600-1700
In the 15th and 16th century, the engagement rings were mostly exchange of poser rings, gold or silver bands with a message engraved on them. Sometimes, silver was seen as a sign of engagement and a gold ring was given during the wedding.

1800
The romantic era saw a high demand in diamonds after a large deposit was discovered in South Africa. This saw the making of Tiffany & Co. and the trend of huge solitaires, flower designs and high setting of the rock on the bands.

EARLY 20th CENTURY
In the Edwardian era engagement rings became a social norm and a must in every wedding. Fine jewelry was in the reach of more population as industries revolutionized class. In this era, the rings were made of a platinum band and ornate designs in which the diamond was set.

1920-1930
In the 20s and 30s, the designs became less feminine and more geometric as the era was about all modern things. The most frequent were diamonds set in platinum or white gold and were accompanied by gems like rubies and sapphires.

1940
In this period, even after the economy being hit by World War II, the designs were bold and big. The designs had motifs like flowers and gold was used to make the band. The population turned to synthetic rubies and sapphires as their budgets tightened.

1970
The princess cut and radiant cuts were invented or perfected in the 70s and their square shapes became very popular for engagement rings, fitting for a generation that embraced the new and different and did away with many of the traditions of the past. This became the year of radiant cuts and princess cuts as their square shapes became popular. They were the new and different thing during this time and attracted all those modern brides.

1990-PRESENT
There has been no set trend and no popular design stayed for very long. There have been trends for sapphires and emeralds but now that is fading. Today people are choosing everything. It’s no more about the trend but about the taste and desire. There are couples that are going for the traditional solitaire set high on a platinum band, some want to go antique and buy emeralds and Victorian designs and some want to customize their own thing.

And, aren’t we blessed that we have the freedom to express our love for one another however we choose!

Let’s chat soon,
Carol
PS If you know of anyone who might like this romp please sign them up HERE!

Here are a few wedding necklace possibilities! Visit: BlingBeadedBaubles.Zibbet.com

 

Thinking about alcohol consumption?

With the holiday weekend upon us…

I started thinking about the history of alcohol consumption. According to Early American Researchers: Colonial America loved their alcohol. Back then they believed alcohol could cure the sick and make strong those who were weak.
Many of our founding fathers drank – and quite frequently. John Adams, for example, began each day with a draft of hard cider. Sam Adams, at one point, even managed his father’s brewery. Even John Hancock was accused of smuggling wine – and knowing him, it was likely true!
Not everyone was on board, of course. Benjamin Rush, one of the signers of the Declaration and founders of American medicine, was actually one of the first to view alcoholism as a disease and an addiction. In the late 1700s, it was estimated that the annual consumption of alcohol for each person over 15 years of age was a whopping 40 gallons!
Yes, early Americans believed alcohol to be healthy – and given their circumstances, they weren’t that far from the truth. Here’s why: there was a far more dangerous and worrisome drink – water.

One sip could make you seriously ill, and everyone knew it.

In fact, lack of drinkable water nearly wiped out the first permanent English settlement at Jamestown, VA. George Percy wrote “cold water taken out of the river…was the destruction of many of our men.”
Later, American history was nearly altered once again during the Revolutionary War.

In the winter of 1777, George Washington suffered huge losses at Valley Forge when 3,000 soldiers were wiped out with illness and another 2,000 had to leave the army because they were so sick. That totaled over 40% of the men Washington had at Valley Forge! One of the causes of these illnesses was lack of clean drinking water.

So what does this have to do with jewelry? I was thinking of champagne (my favorite) and this means BUBBLES!  Introducing my Bubble Series of Designs. Festive Bubbles around your neck and in your glass! Added Bonus: Watch this incredible Bubble Video!
https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/KMrvR836TFI?rel=0
Let’s chat soon,
Carol
BlingBeadedBaubles.Zibbet.com

Bubble 5-28  Bubble Blue
Bubble Orange         

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